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Warren addresses ‘Pocahontas ’ jabs at Native American conference

Added on 14 February 2018 - 20:25 'Viewed 4 views times.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren made a surprise appearance at the National Congress of American Indians on Wednesday to embrace her Native American heritage and to admonish President Trump for mocking her as “Pocahontas.”

“I get why some people think there ’s hay to be made here. You won ’t find my family members on any rolls, and I ’m not enrolled in a tribe,” Warren said in remarks first obtained by the Boston Globe.

see also

Navajo leader rips Trump for 'Pocahontas' remark during ceremony

Navajo leader rips Trump for ‘Pocahontas’ remark during ceremony

The president of the Navajo Nation ripped President Trump for… “And I want to make something clear. I respect that distinction,” she continued. “I understand that tribal membership is determined by tribes – and only by tribes. I never used my family tree to get a break or get ahead. I never used it to advance my career.”

Warren, a Democrat from Massachusetts, has been accused of claiming Native American ancestry to appear as a minority to boost her academic career, including when she taught at Harvard Law School.

She rebuked Trump for referring to her as “Pocahontas,” including during a White House ceremony last November to honor Navajo code talkers who fought in World War II.

“We have a president who can ’t make it through a ceremony honoring Native American war heroes without reducing Native history, Native culture, Native people to the butt of a joke,” Warren said.

She said her mother was born on Valentine ’s Day 1912 in Oklahoma, and when she met Warren ’s father, “my daddy fell head over heels in love with her.”

“But my mother ’s family was part Native American. And my daddy ’s parents were bitterly opposed to their relationship. So, in 1932, when Mother was 19 and Daddy had just turned 20, they eloped,” she said.

Warren described the love they shared and the struggles they endured and that story “will always be a part of me.”

“And no one – not even the President of the United States – will ever take that part of me away,” she said.

The senator also vowed that she will be a tireless advocate for Native Americans.

“For far too long, your story has been pushed aside, to be trotted out only in cartoons and commercials,” she said. “So I ’m here today to make a promise: Every time someone brings up my family ’s story, I ’m going to use it to lift up the story of your families and your communities.”

Sen. Elizabeth Warren made a surprise appearance at the National Congress of American Indians on Wednesday to embrace her Native American heritage and to admonish President Trump for mocking her as “Pocahontas.”

“I get why some people think there ’s hay to be made here. You won ’t find my family members on any rolls, and I ’m not enrolled in a tribe,” Warren said in remarks first obtained by the Boston Globe.

see also

Navajo leader rips Trump for 'Pocahontas' remark during ceremony

Navajo leader rips Trump for ‘Pocahontas’ remark during ceremony

The president of the Navajo Nation ripped President Trump for… “And I want to make something clear. I respect that distinction,” she continued. “I understand that tribal membership is determined by tribes – and only by tribes. I never used my family tree to get a break or get ahead. I never used it to advance my career.”

Warren, a Democrat from Massachusetts, has been accused of claiming Native American ancestry to appear as a minority to boost her academic career, including when she taught at Harvard Law School.

She rebuked Trump for referring to her as “Pocahontas,” including during a White House ceremony last November to honor Navajo code talkers who fought in World War II.

“We have a president who can ’t make it through a ceremony honoring Native American war heroes without reducing Native history, Native culture, Native people to the butt of a joke,” Warren said.

She said her mother was born on Valentine ’s Day 1912 in Oklahoma, and when she met Warren ’s father, “my daddy fell head over heels in love with her.”

“But my mother ’s family was part Native American. And my daddy ’s parents were bitterly opposed to their relationship. So, in 1932, when Mother was 19 and Daddy had just turned 20, they eloped,” she said.

Warren described the love they shared and the struggles they endured and that story “will always be a part of me.”

“And no one – not even the President of the United States – will ever take that part of me away,” she said.

The senator also vowed that she will be a tireless advocate for Native Americans.

“For far too long, your story has been pushed aside, to be trotted out only in cartoons and commercials,” she said. “So I ’m here today to make a promise: Every time someone brings up my family ’s story, I ’m going to use it to lift up the story of your families and your communities.”

Sen. Elizabeth Warren made a surprise appearance at the National Congress of American Indians on Wednesday to embrace her Native American heritage and to admonish President Trump for mocking her as “Pocahontas.”

“I get why some people think there ’s hay to be made here. You won ’t find my family members on any rolls, and I ’m not enrolled in a tribe,” Warren said in remarks first obtained by the Boston Globe.

see also

Navajo leader rips Trump for 'Pocahontas' remark during ceremony

Navajo leader rips Trump for ‘Pocahontas’ remark during ceremony

The president of the Navajo Nation ripped President Trump for… “And I want to make something clear. I respect that distinction,” she continued. “I understand that tribal membership is determined by tribes – and only by tribes. I never used my family tree to get a break or get ahead. I never used it to advance my career.”

Warren, a Democrat from Massachusetts, has been accused of claiming Native American ancestry to appear as a minority to boost her academic career, including when she taught at Harvard Law School.

She rebuked Trump for referring to her as “Pocahontas,” including during a White House ceremony last November to honor Navajo code talkers who fought in World War II.

“We have a president who can ’t make it through a ceremony honoring Native American war heroes without reducing Native history, Native culture, Native people to the butt of a joke,” Warren said.

She said her mother was born on Valentine ’s Day 1912 in Oklahoma, and when she met Warren ’s father, “my daddy fell head over heels in love with her.”

“But my mother ’s family was part Native American. And my daddy ’s parents were bitterly opposed to their relationship. So, in 1932, when Mother was 19 and Daddy had just turned 20, they eloped,” she said.

Warren described the love they shared and the struggles they endured and that story “will always be a part of me.”

“And no one – not even the President of the United States – will ever take that part of me away,” she said.

The senator also vowed that she will be a tireless advocate for Native Americans.

“For far too long, your story has been pushed aside, to be trotted out only in cartoons and commercials,” she said. “So I ’m here today to make a promise: Every time someone brings up my family ’s story, I ’m going to use it to lift up the story of your families and your communities.”

Sen. Elizabeth Warren made a surprise appearance at the National Congress of American Indians on Wednesday to embrace her Native American heritage and to admonish President Trump for mocking her as “Pocahontas.”

“I get why some people think there ’s hay to be made here. You won ’t find my family members on any rolls, and I ’m not enrolled in a tribe,” Warren said in remarks first obtained by the Boston Globe.

see also

Navajo leader rips Trump for 'Pocahontas' remark during ceremony

Navajo leader rips Trump for ‘Pocahontas’ remark during ceremony

The president of the Navajo Nation ripped President Trump for… “And I want to make something clear. I respect that distinction,” she continued. “I understand that tribal membership is determined by tribes – and only by tribes. I never used my family tree to get a break or get ahead. I never used it to advance my career.”

Warren, a Democrat from Massachusetts, has been accused of claiming Native American ancestry to appear as a minority to boost her academic career, including when she taught at Harvard Law School.

She rebuked Trump for referring to her as “Pocahontas,” including during a White House ceremony last November to honor Navajo code talkers who fought in World War II.

“We have a president who can ’t make it through a ceremony honoring Native American war heroes without reducing Native history, Native culture, Native people to the butt of a joke,” Warren said.

She said her mother was born on Valentine ’s Day 1912 in Oklahoma, and when she met Warren ’s father, “my daddy fell head over heels in love with her.”

“But my mother ’s family was part Native American. And my daddy ’s parents were bitterly opposed to their relationship. So, in 1932, when Mother was 19 and Daddy had just turned 20, they eloped,” she said.

Warren described the love they shared and the struggles they endured and that story “will always be a part of me.”

“And no one – not even the President of the United States – will ever take that part of me away,” she said.

The senator also vowed that she will be a tireless advocate for Native Americans.

“For far too long, your story has been pushed aside, to be trotted out only in cartoons and commercials,” she said. “So I ’m here today to make a promise: Every time someone brings up my family ’s story, I ’m going to use it to lift up the story of your families and your communities.”

Sen. Elizabeth Warren made a surprise appearance at the National Congress of American Indians on Wednesday to embrace her Native American heritage and to admonish President Trump for mocking her as “Pocahontas.”

“I get why some people think there ’s hay to be made here. You won ’t find my family members on any rolls, and I ’m not enrolled in a tribe,” Warren said in remarks first obtained by the Boston Globe.

see also

Navajo leader rips Trump for 'Pocahontas' remark during ceremony

Navajo leader rips Trump for ‘Pocahontas’ remark during ceremony

The president of the Navajo Nation ripped President Trump for… “And I want to make something clear. I respect that distinction,” she continued. “I understand that tribal membership is determined by tribes – and only by tribes. I never used my family tree to get a break or get ahead. I never used it to advance my career.”

Warren, a Democrat from Massachusetts, has been accused of claiming Native American ancestry to appear as a minority to boost her academic career, including when she taught at Harvard Law School.

She rebuked Trump for referring to her as “Pocahontas,” including during a White House ceremony last November to honor Navajo code talkers who fought in World War II.

“We have a president who can ’t make it through a ceremony honoring Native American war heroes without reducing Native history, Native culture, Native people to the butt of a joke,” Warren said.

She said her mother was born on Valentine ’s Day 1912 in Oklahoma, and when she met Warren ’s father, “my daddy fell head over heels in love with her.”

“But my mother ’s family was part Native American. And my daddy ’s parents were bitterly opposed to their relationship. So, in 1932, when Mother was 19 and Daddy had just turned 20, they eloped,” she said.

Warren described the love they shared and the struggles they endured and that story “will always be a part of me.”

“And no one – not even the President of the United States – will ever take that part of me away,” she said.

The senator also vowed that she will be a tireless advocate for Native Americans.

“For far too long, your story has been pushed aside, to be trotted out only in cartoons and commercials,” she said. “So I ’m here today to make a promise: Every time someone brings up my family ’s story, I ’m going to use it to lift up the story of your families and your communities.”

Sen. Elizabeth Warren made a surprise appearance at the National Congress of American Indians on Wednesday to embrace her Native American heritage and to admonish President Trump for mocking her as “Pocahontas.”

“I get why some people think there ’s hay to be made here. You won ’t find my family members on any rolls, and I ’m not enrolled in a tribe,” Warren said in remarks first obtained by the Boston Globe.

see also

Navajo leader rips Trump for 'Pocahontas' remark during ceremony

Navajo leader rips Trump for ‘Pocahontas’ remark during ceremony

The president of the Navajo Nation ripped President Trump for… “And I want to make something clear. I respect that distinction,” she continued. “I understand that tribal membership is determined by tribes – and only by tribes. I never used my family tree to get a break or get ahead. I never used it to advance my career.”

Warren, a Democrat from Massachusetts, has been accused of claiming Native American ancestry to appear as a minority to boost her academic career, including when she taught at Harvard Law School.

She rebuked Trump for referring to her as “Pocahontas,” including during a White House ceremony last November to honor Navajo code talkers who fought in World War II.

“We have a president who can ’t make it through a ceremony honoring Native American war heroes without reducing Native history, Native culture, Native people to the butt of a joke,” Warren said.

She said her mother was born on Valentine ’s Day 1912 in Oklahoma, and when she met Warren ’s father, “my daddy fell head over heels in love with her.”

“But my mother ’s family was part Native American. And my daddy ’s parents were bitterly opposed to their relationship. So, in 1932, when Mother was 19 and Daddy had just turned 20, they eloped,” she said.

Warren described the love they shared and the struggles they endured and that story “will always be a part of me.”

“And no one – not even the President of the United States – will ever take that part of me away,” she said.

The senator also vowed that she will be a tireless advocate for Native Americans.

“For far too long, your story has been pushed aside, to be trotted out only in cartoons and commercials,” she said. “So I ’m here today to make a promise: Every time someone brings up my family ’s story, I ’m going to use it to lift up the story of your families and your communities.”

Sen. Elizabeth Warren made a surprise appearance at the National Congress of American Indians on Wednesday to embrace her Native American heritage and to admonish President Trump for mocking her as “Pocahontas.”

“I get why some people think there ’s hay to be made here. You won ’t find my family members on any rolls, and I ’m not enrolled in a tribe,” Warren said in remarks first obtained by the Boston Globe.

see also

Navajo leader rips Trump for 'Pocahontas' remark during ceremony

Navajo leader rips Trump for ‘Pocahontas’ remark during ceremony

The president of the Navajo Nation ripped President Trump for… “And I want to make something clear. I respect that distinction,” she continued. “I understand that tribal membership is determined by tribes – and only by tribes. I never used my family tree to get a break or get ahead. I never used it to advance my career.”

Warren, a Democrat from Massachusetts, has been accused of claiming Native American ancestry to appear as a minority to boost her academic career, including when she taught at Harvard Law School.

She rebuked Trump for referring to her as “Pocahontas,” including during a White House ceremony last November to honor Navajo code talkers who fought in World War II.

“We have a president who can ’t make it through a ceremony honoring Native American war heroes without reducing Native history, Native culture, Native people to the butt of a joke,” Warren said.

She said her mother was born on Valentine ’s Day 1912 in Oklahoma, and when she met Warren ’s father, “my daddy fell head over heels in love with her.”

“But my mother ’s family was part Native American. And my daddy ’s parents were bitterly opposed to their relationship. So, in 1932, when Mother was 19 and Daddy had just turned 20, they eloped,” she said.

Warren described the love they shared and the struggles they endured and that story “will always be a part of me.”

“And no one – not even the President of the United States – will ever take that part of me away,” she said.

The senator also vowed that she will be a tireless advocate for Native Americans.

“For far too long, your story has been pushed aside, to be trotted out only in cartoons and commercials,” she said. “So I ’m here today to make a promise: Every time someone brings up my family ’s story, I ’m going to use it to lift up the story of your families and your communities.”

Sen. Elizabeth Warren made a surprise appearance at the National Congress of American Indians on Wednesday to embrace her Native American heritage and to admonish President Trump for mocking her as “Pocahontas.”

“I get why some people think there ’s hay to be made here. You won ’t find my family members on any rolls, and I ’m not enrolled in a tribe,” Warren said in remarks first obtained by the Boston Globe.

see also

Navajo leader rips Trump for 'Pocahontas' remark during ceremony

Navajo leader rips Trump for ‘Pocahontas’ remark during ceremony

The president of the Navajo Nation ripped President Trump for… “And I want to make something clear. I respect that distinction,” she continued. “I understand that tribal membership is determined by tribes – and only by tribes. I never used my family tree to get a break or get ahead. I never used it to advance my career.”

Warren, a Democrat from Massachusetts, has been accused of claiming Native American ancestry to appear as a minority to boost her academic career, including when she taught at Harvard Law School.

She rebuked Trump for referring to her as “Pocahontas,” including during a White House ceremony last November to honor Navajo code talkers who fought in World War II.

“We have a president who can ’t make it through a ceremony honoring Native American war heroes without reducing Native history, Native culture, Native people to the butt of a joke,” Warren said.

She said her mother was born on Valentine ’s Day 1912 in Oklahoma, and when she met Warren ’s father, “my daddy fell head over heels in love with her.”

“But my mother ’s family was part Native American. And my daddy ’s parents were bitterly opposed to their relationship. So, in 1932, when Mother was 19 and Daddy had just turned 20, they eloped,” she said.

Warren described the love they shared and the struggles they endured and that story “will always be a part of me.”

“And no one – not even the President of the United States – will ever take that part of me away,” she said.

The senator also vowed that she will be a tireless advocate for Native Americans.

“For far too long, your story has been pushed aside, to be trotted out only in cartoons and commercials,” she said. “So I ’m here today to make a promise: Every time someone brings up my family ’s story, I ’m going to use it to lift up the story of your families and your communities.”

Sen. Elizabeth Warren made a surprise appearance at the National Congress of American Indians on Wednesday to embrace her Native American heritage and to admonish President Trump for mocking her as “Pocahontas.”

“I get why some people think there ’s hay to be made here. You won ’t find my family members on any rolls, and I ’m not enrolled in a tribe,” Warren said in remarks first obtained by the Boston Globe.

see also

Navajo leader rips Trump for 'Pocahontas' remark during ceremony

Navajo leader rips Trump for ‘Pocahontas’ remark during ceremony

The president of the Navajo Nation ripped President Trump for… “And I want to make something clear. I respect that distinction,” she continued. “I understand that tribal membership is determined by tribes – and only by tribes. I never used my family tree to get a break or get ahead. I never used it to advance my career.”

Warren, a Democrat from Massachusetts, has been accused of claiming Native American ancestry to appear as a minority to boost her academic career, including when she taught at Harvard Law School.

She rebuked Trump for referring to her as “Pocahontas,” including during a White House ceremony last November to honor Navajo code talkers who fought in World War II.

“We have a president who can ’t make it through a ceremony honoring Native American war heroes without reducing Native history, Native culture, Native people to the butt of a joke,” Warren said.

She said her mother was born on Valentine ’s Day 1912 in Oklahoma, and when she met Warren ’s father, “my daddy fell head over heels in love with her.”

“But my mother ’s family was part Native American. And my daddy ’s parents were bitterly opposed to their relationship. So, in 1932, when Mother was 19 and Daddy had just turned 20, they eloped,” she said.

Warren described the love they shared and the struggles they endured and that story “will always be a part of me.”

“And no one – not even the President of the United States – will ever take that part of me away,” she said.

The senator also vowed that she will be a tireless advocate for Native Americans.

“For far too long, your story has been pushed aside, to be trotted out only in cartoons and commercials,” she said. “So I ’m here today to make a promise: Every time someone brings up my family ’s story, I ’m going to use it to lift up the story of your families and your communities.”

Sen. Elizabeth Warren made a surprise appearance at the National Congress of American Indians on Wednesday to embrace her Native American heritage and to admonish President Trump for mocking her as “Pocahontas.”

“I get why some people think there ’s hay to be made here. You won ’t find my family members on any rolls, and I ’m not enrolled in a tribe,” Warren said in remarks first obtained by the Boston Globe.

see also

Navajo leader rips Trump for 'Pocahontas' remark during ceremony

Navajo leader rips Trump for ‘Pocahontas’ remark during ceremony

The president of the Navajo Nation ripped President Trump for… “And I want to make something clear. I respect that distinction,” she continued. “I understand that tribal membership is determined by tribes – and only by tribes. I never used my family tree to get a break or get ahead. I never used it to advance my career.”

Warren, a Democrat from Massachusetts, has been accused of claiming Native American ancestry to appear as a minority to boost her academic career, including when she taught at Harvard Law School.

She rebuked Trump for referring to her as “Pocahontas,” including during a White House ceremony last November to honor Navajo code talkers who fought in World War II.

“We have a president who can ’t make it through a ceremony honoring Native American war heroes without reducing Native history, Native culture, Native people to the butt of a joke,” Warren said.

She said her mother was born on Valentine ’s Day 1912 in Oklahoma, and when she met Warren ’s father, “my daddy fell head over heels in love with her.”

“But my mother ’s family was part Native American. And my daddy ’s parents were bitterly opposed to their relationship. So, in 1932, when Mother was 19 and Daddy had just turned 20, they eloped,” she said.

Warren described the love they shared and the struggles they endured and that story “will always be a part of me.”

“And no one – not even the President of the United States – will ever take that part of me away,” she said.

The senator also vowed that she will be a tireless advocate for Native Americans.

“For far too long, your story has been pushed aside, to be trotted out only in cartoons and commercials,” she said. “So I ’m here today to make a promise: Every time someone brings up my family ’s story, I ’m going to use it to lift up the story of your families and your communities.”

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