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A Virginia school said it would charge students 5 cents per piece of paper. It was a lesson plan gone awry.

Added on 09 January 2018 - 12:39 'Viewed 14 views times.

Parents were sent a message in mid-December informing them the faux letter would be sent when students returned to school from winter break. That warning, it appeared, may have been lost in the holiday hubbub.

“Though this lesson was well-intended, we recognize that the fictitious letter has caused unnecessary confusion for community members,” schools spokesman John Torre said in an email. “The lesson and related resources have been removed.”

Lynn Smith, president of Laurel Ridge ’s PTA, said she heard from a small number of parents on Facebook who had questions about the letter.

The students, Smith said, were expected to react to the 5-cent fee after reading the letter and draw a connection to how colonists would have felt when the Stamp Act — a tax on paper imposed by the British on American colonists — was levied on them.

“It ’s a really great lesson,” said Smith, whose fourth-grade son received the letter. “It really was able to bring that lesson home.”

Those fooled by the letter may not have been without reason. Fairfax has grappled in the past decade to keep pace with rising service demands in an economy still bruised by the recession and billions of dollars in cuts to federal spending.

At the start of the current school year, the school system grappled with $50 million in budget cuts. The school board voted to raise class sizes by an average of about half a student per class, was forced to scale back plans for teacher pay raises and imposed a $50 fee on student athletes.

Jane Strauss, the school board chairwoman, said students are encouraged to apply modern knowledge to make sense of history, which the Stamp Act lesson accomplished.

“That is a very legitimate teaching technique,” Strauss said.

But, she added, “it can ’t look that real.”

Parents were sent a message in mid-December informing them the faux letter would be sent when students returned to school from winter break. That warning, it appeared, may have been lost in the holiday hubbub.

“Though this lesson was well-intended, we recognize that the fictitious letter has caused unnecessary confusion for community members,” schools spokesman John Torre said in an email. “The lesson and related resources have been removed.”

Lynn Smith, president of Laurel Ridge ’s PTA, said she heard from a small number of parents on Facebook who had questions about the letter.

The students, Smith said, were expected to react to the 5-cent fee after reading the letter and draw a connection to how colonists would have felt when the Stamp Act — a tax on paper imposed by the British on American colonists — was levied on them.

“It ’s a really great lesson,” said Smith, whose fourth-grade son received the letter. “It really was able to bring that lesson home.”

Those fooled by the letter may not have been without reason. Fairfax has grappled in the past decade to keep pace with rising service demands in an economy still bruised by the recession and billions of dollars in cuts to federal spending.

At the start of the current school year, the school system grappled with $50 million in budget cuts. The school board voted to raise class sizes by an average of about half a student per class, was forced to scale back plans for teacher pay raises and imposed a $50 fee on student athletes.

Jane Strauss, the school board chairwoman, said students are encouraged to apply modern knowledge to make sense of history, which the Stamp Act lesson accomplished.

“That is a very legitimate teaching technique,” Strauss said.

But, she added, “it can ’t look that real.”

Parents were sent a message in mid-December informing them the faux letter would be sent when students returned to school from winter break. That warning, it appeared, may have been lost in the holiday hubbub.

“Though this lesson was well-intended, we recognize that the fictitious letter has caused unnecessary confusion for community members,” schools spokesman John Torre said in an email. “The lesson and related resources have been removed.”

Lynn Smith, president of Laurel Ridge ’s PTA, said she heard from a small number of parents on Facebook who had questions about the letter.

The students, Smith said, were expected to react to the 5-cent fee after reading the letter and draw a connection to how colonists would have felt when the Stamp Act — a tax on paper imposed by the British on American colonists — was levied on them.

“It ’s a really great lesson,” said Smith, whose fourth-grade son received the letter. “It really was able to bring that lesson home.”

Those fooled by the letter may not have been without reason. Fairfax has grappled in the past decade to keep pace with rising service demands in an economy still bruised by the recession and billions of dollars in cuts to federal spending.

At the start of the current school year, the school system grappled with $50 million in budget cuts. The school board voted to raise class sizes by an average of about half a student per class, was forced to scale back plans for teacher pay raises and imposed a $50 fee on student athletes.

Jane Strauss, the school board chairwoman, said students are encouraged to apply modern knowledge to make sense of history, which the Stamp Act lesson accomplished.

“That is a very legitimate teaching technique,” Strauss said.

But, she added, “it can ’t look that real.”

Parents were sent a message in mid-December informing them the faux letter would be sent when students returned to school from winter break. That warning, it appeared, may have been lost in the holiday hubbub.

“Though this lesson was well-intended, we recognize that the fictitious letter has caused unnecessary confusion for community members,” schools spokesman John Torre said in an email. “The lesson and related resources have been removed.”

Lynn Smith, president of Laurel Ridge ’s PTA, said she heard from a small number of parents on Facebook who had questions about the letter.

The students, Smith said, were expected to react to the 5-cent fee after reading the letter and draw a connection to how colonists would have felt when the Stamp Act — a tax on paper imposed by the British on American colonists — was levied on them.

“It ’s a really great lesson,” said Smith, whose fourth-grade son received the letter. “It really was able to bring that lesson home.”

Those fooled by the letter may not have been without reason. Fairfax has grappled in the past decade to keep pace with rising service demands in an economy still bruised by the recession and billions of dollars in cuts to federal spending.

At the start of the current school year, the school system grappled with $50 million in budget cuts. The school board voted to raise class sizes by an average of about half a student per class, was forced to scale back plans for teacher pay raises and imposed a $50 fee on student athletes.

Jane Strauss, the school board chairwoman, said students are encouraged to apply modern knowledge to make sense of history, which the Stamp Act lesson accomplished.

“That is a very legitimate teaching technique,” Strauss said.

But, she added, “it can ’t look that real.”

Parents were sent a message in mid-December informing them the faux letter would be sent when students returned to school from winter break. That warning, it appeared, may have been lost in the holiday hubbub.

“Though this lesson was well-intended, we recognize that the fictitious letter has caused unnecessary confusion for community members,” schools spokesman John Torre said in an email. “The lesson and related resources have been removed.”

Lynn Smith, president of Laurel Ridge ’s PTA, said she heard from a small number of parents on Facebook who had questions about the letter.

The students, Smith said, were expected to react to the 5-cent fee after reading the letter and draw a connection to how colonists would have felt when the Stamp Act — a tax on paper imposed by the British on American colonists — was levied on them.

“It ’s a really great lesson,” said Smith, whose fourth-grade son received the letter. “It really was able to bring that lesson home.”

Those fooled by the letter may not have been without reason. Fairfax has grappled in the past decade to keep pace with rising service demands in an economy still bruised by the recession and billions of dollars in cuts to federal spending.

At the start of the current school year, the school system grappled with $50 million in budget cuts. The school board voted to raise class sizes by an average of about half a student per class, was forced to scale back plans for teacher pay raises and imposed a $50 fee on student athletes.

Jane Strauss, the school board chairwoman, said students are encouraged to apply modern knowledge to make sense of history, which the Stamp Act lesson accomplished.

“That is a very legitimate teaching technique,” Strauss said.

But, she added, “it can ’t look that real.”

Parents were sent a message in mid-December informing them the faux letter would be sent when students returned to school from winter break. That warning, it appeared, may have been lost in the holiday hubbub.

“Though this lesson was well-intended, we recognize that the fictitious letter has caused unnecessary confusion for community members,” schools spokesman John Torre said in an email. “The lesson and related resources have been removed.”

Lynn Smith, president of Laurel Ridge ’s PTA, said she heard from a small number of parents on Facebook who had questions about the letter.

The students, Smith said, were expected to react to the 5-cent fee after reading the letter and draw a connection to how colonists would have felt when the Stamp Act — a tax on paper imposed by the British on American colonists — was levied on them.

“It ’s a really great lesson,” said Smith, whose fourth-grade son received the letter. “It really was able to bring that lesson home.”

Those fooled by the letter may not have been without reason. Fairfax has grappled in the past decade to keep pace with rising service demands in an economy still bruised by the recession and billions of dollars in cuts to federal spending.

At the start of the current school year, the school system grappled with $50 million in budget cuts. The school board voted to raise class sizes by an average of about half a student per class, was forced to scale back plans for teacher pay raises and imposed a $50 fee on student athletes.

Jane Strauss, the school board chairwoman, said students are encouraged to apply modern knowledge to make sense of history, which the Stamp Act lesson accomplished.

“That is a very legitimate teaching technique,” Strauss said.

But, she added, “it can ’t look that real.”

Parents were sent a message in mid-December informing them the faux letter would be sent when students returned to school from winter break. That warning, it appeared, may have been lost in the holiday hubbub.

“Though this lesson was well-intended, we recognize that the fictitious letter has caused unnecessary confusion for community members,” schools spokesman John Torre said in an email. “The lesson and related resources have been removed.”

Lynn Smith, president of Laurel Ridge ’s PTA, said she heard from a small number of parents on Facebook who had questions about the letter.

The students, Smith said, were expected to react to the 5-cent fee after reading the letter and draw a connection to how colonists would have felt when the Stamp Act — a tax on paper imposed by the British on American colonists — was levied on them.

“It ’s a really great lesson,” said Smith, whose fourth-grade son received the letter. “It really was able to bring that lesson home.”

Those fooled by the letter may not have been without reason. Fairfax has grappled in the past decade to keep pace with rising service demands in an economy still bruised by the recession and billions of dollars in cuts to federal spending.

At the start of the current school year, the school system grappled with $50 million in budget cuts. The school board voted to raise class sizes by an average of about half a student per class, was forced to scale back plans for teacher pay raises and imposed a $50 fee on student athletes.

Jane Strauss, the school board chairwoman, said students are encouraged to apply modern knowledge to make sense of history, which the Stamp Act lesson accomplished.

“That is a very legitimate teaching technique,” Strauss said.

But, she added, “it can ’t look that real.”

Parents were sent a message in mid-December informing them the faux letter would be sent when students returned to school from winter break. That warning, it appeared, may have been lost in the holiday hubbub.

“Though this lesson was well-intended, we recognize that the fictitious letter has caused unnecessary confusion for community members,” schools spokesman John Torre said in an email. “The lesson and related resources have been removed.”

Lynn Smith, president of Laurel Ridge ’s PTA, said she heard from a small number of parents on Facebook who had questions about the letter.

The students, Smith said, were expected to react to the 5-cent fee after reading the letter and draw a connection to how colonists would have felt when the Stamp Act — a tax on paper imposed by the British on American colonists — was levied on them.

“It ’s a really great lesson,” said Smith, whose fourth-grade son received the letter. “It really was able to bring that lesson home.”

Those fooled by the letter may not have been without reason. Fairfax has grappled in the past decade to keep pace with rising service demands in an economy still bruised by the recession and billions of dollars in cuts to federal spending.

At the start of the current school year, the school system grappled with $50 million in budget cuts. The school board voted to raise class sizes by an average of about half a student per class, was forced to scale back plans for teacher pay raises and imposed a $50 fee on student athletes.

Jane Strauss, the school board chairwoman, said students are encouraged to apply modern knowledge to make sense of history, which the Stamp Act lesson accomplished.

“That is a very legitimate teaching technique,” Strauss said.

But, she added, “it can ’t look that real.”

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